Tag Archives: Foods

La BUSA Italian Restaurant & Bar, Newly Opened Hangout Place for Italian Food Lovers

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu - Namesign

La Busa Italian Restaurant Lahug near JYMall

Last night I went to La BUSA Italian Restaurant & Bar with my CBSi pals to check out the newly opened place.  We were entertained by Stefano Quaquarelli, the chef and owner of the resto.  We had a good time checking their menu while catching up with each other.

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu - Cebu Bloggers Society Members 2

La BUSA is located at the ground floor of  Tsai Hotel and Residences.  It is a few walks away from JY Square Mall in Lahug.

Highly Recommended Courses in the Menu

Chef Stefanno assured us that all foods in their menu are cooked from fresh ingredients.  He goes to the market daily to buy them.  I assume that the restaurant is a family business because he is running it along with his mom.  The two of them were quite busy in the kitchen when we arrived.

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu - Braciola Di Maiale Pan Seared Pork Chop with Saute Beans

Braciola Di Maiale Pan Seared Pork Chop with Saute Beans – definitely a must try.

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu - Lasagna Classic Italian Recipe

Lasagna Classic Italian Recipe – nothing can go wrong with this one.

Highly Recommended Desserts

All their desserts are super yummy.  Unfortunately, I haven’t tasted their Panna Cotta because they run out of ingredients. ):

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu - Tiramisu

Tiramisu

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu -  Cheesecake

Cheese Cake in a Glass

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu - Apple Pie

Apple Pie

The Interior

La Busa Italian Restaurant Lahug Cebu City

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu - Drink List

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu - Interior

Menu and Prices

Compared to other Italian restaurants, La BUSA has more reasonable prices and much much cheaper than Italiannis in Ayala Terraces.  Click image below to clearly see the menu.

La Busa Italian Restaurant Cebu - Menu with Prices

About Chef Stefano Quaquarelli

Chef Stefanno of La BUSA Italian Restaurant and Bar Lahug Cebu

Chef Stefanno has worked in various Italian restaurants in China such as La Bettola, La Bottega, Frantoi Celletti, and Gisa Italian Restaurant.  He started the pre-opening of La BUSA on July this year and looks forward for its official public launching soon.

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Lapu-lapu SuTukil Resto – A Big Rip Off! #ReviewTuesday

Lapu lapu Sutukil

The day we returned here in Cebu from our Manila trip, dude and I already decided that we’ll eat at Sutukil.  The fact that I’ve already went to Sutukil (a seafood restaurant near Capitol) made me think that we’ll be dining at a nice restaurant with fresh and sumptuous seafood dishes in the menu.  But, the next thing that happened to our food trip in Lapu-lapu is contrary to what I was expecting.

The Foursquare Search

Since I have no idea where Sutukil is located in Lapu-lapu, I used Foursquare to search for its specific location.  I found out that it is located near Mactan Shrine.  Note: I had no idea that the one I found in Foursquare is not the restaurant that I was looking.

When we arrived at the place, I was a bit shocked because it was absolutely contrary to what I expected.  I was expecting the same Sutukil resto, the one we dined in a few years ago for my friend’s birthday celebration.

The moment we stepped out of the taxi, we were immediately mobbed by men, each of them was convincing us to choose their Sutukil resto.  Another man, offered us umbrella to avoid the heat of the sun.  I was like – is this a joke?  Are we lost?  And then the truth just sank in.  We were indeed at Sutukil but it is not the resto where I dined in a few years ago. ):

SuTuKil Restaurants in Lapu-lapu

The SuTuKil in Lapu-lapu is a cluster of locally-owned small restaurants that offer the famous Cebu dishes – Su (Sugba), Tu (Tuwa), Kil (Kilaw).  I was actually a bit disappointed when we arrived at the actual area.  While the the salesmen were busy convincing us to check each of the resto they represented, I can’t help but feel a sense of dread – something inside my head was telling me to leave and look for another place to eat.  But, before I can make a decision, my mouth had already spoken.  I’ve already told the “salesman” that we will be dining at their resto because it had a second floor and has a view by the beach.

Sutukil LapulapuCredit as tagged

This is how the Sutukil restaurants look like.  The unfortunate thing is until now I still can’t recall the name of the  resto where we dined in.

Fredz Sutukil LapulapuPhoto Credit: Pierre Marius

 I tried to search for some photos online and I got this one.  Still, I’m not sure if this is the resto.  All I can remember is the cashier area that is decorated by seashells.   I only managed to take photos of the inside.  See pictures below.

SuTuKil Lapulapu

This is how the inside looks like.  We were going to the 2nd floor because we were being promised of a good lunch view there.

Lunch View SuTuKil Lapulapu

But it was not what I expected.  Though the place is airy and has a good view of the beach, it smells muddy and surrounded by hostile people and children begging for money from the guests.  But, all these downsides shouldn’t have mattered if the foods are good and if they are fairly priced.

The Rip Off Menu

Though this story may seem a bit sad but we actually have a very hearty lunch.  Part of our laugh trip were the unsuspecting Koreans (who also got ripped off big time – no idea how much they have paid but I’m quite sure the rate is higher than ours).  We were also serenaded by a group of in-house “band” who also asked for a payment for their 10-minute show.

Moving on, after having so much fun, criticizing our food and our lunch neighbors, we got the shock of our lives when the bill arrived.  The total cost of our lunch is Php1, 500 plus.  I can’t recall the exact total cost but that’s the very close estimate.  WTF!  I can’t believe I’ll be paying this amount over a 3-course menu and a side dish in a local restaurant situated in a shanty place, smelly muddy beach, hostile people all over the area, and worst, a facility that’s only at par with ordinary “Karenderya” (tiny restaurants in street corners).  Below are the photos of the foods that we ordered.

Mud Crab in Chilli Sauce Sutukil Lapulapu

This is Mud Crab in Chilli Sauce.  We only had four of this because I felt (when I ordered) the price for each crab is super expensive.

Mud Crab in Chilli Sauce 2 Sutukil Lapulapu

Though it tastes good, my friend commented that the sauce is purely made from ketchup.  The other two of my companions echoed the same opinion.

Grilled Fish Sutukil Lapulapu

There’s really nothing special with this grilled fish.  I have no fucking idea why it cost us a lot.  This is from the fish that I ordered.  The waiter/cook in the counter offered us that they will grill half of the fish and they will make a “tinula” of the other half.

Tinulang Isda Sutukil Lapulapu

This is the rip off Tinula that they served.  The head of the fish is like an omen that foretells our ominous fate. ):

Kinilaw na Gusu - Sutukil Lapulapu

The Kinilaw na Gusu which normally costs Php10 to 30 at local Karenderyas cost us a lot in this food trip.  How fucking great is that?  Because I get so agitated after looking at the receipt, I forgot to keep it after we exited from that bloody restaurant.  The only thing that I can’t forget is the additional payments they asked us for the cooking service – Mad Crab Chilli Sauce Cooking Fee, Fish Tinula Cooking Fee, and Grilled Fish Cooking Fee.  Each payment costs at least Php80.00 (that’s a chicken meal in KFC already!!!).

Normally, I really don’t complain about food prices if it is fairly priced.  Like those restaurants in IT Park and Ayala Terraces that offer good ambiance, service, and of course a menu that is jam-packed with sumptuous dishes.  But, this one I really can’t just let go.  The place is awful, the food is so-so, and the pricing is a BIG rip off!!! No wonder we were the only guests (except the Koreans) on that day.

Please, please, please.  For your own wallet and palate sake, avoid this Sutukil Restaurants near Mactan Shrine.  For affordable yet super delectable seafood dishes you can try AA BBQ and Neo-Neo.

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Yoshinoya – An Affordable Japanese Resto #FoodieWednesday

Yoshinoya

Dude and I often look for affordable Japanese restaurants and we were amazed at what we found when we visited MOA a few weeks ago.  This Japanese resto is actually located beside J.CO store, the doughnut shop that I was talking in my previous post.  Look at how bloody affordable their menu is.

Yoshinoya Japanese Resto Manila - Menu

Their prices are around 20% lower compared to Tokyo Joe’s (another Japanese resto where dude and I go to here in Cebu).  I was really in the mood to eat a lot when we were on our way.  But, my friggin’ migraine has stolen my appetite the moment we entered the store.  ):  Nevertheless, I really enjoyed their California Maki and their Beef Yakiniku.

Yoshinoya  California Maki

California Maki is my all-time favorite Japanese dish.  My Japanese meal is not complete without it.  This set is priced at P59.00.  Super cheap!! (:

Beef Yakiniku - Yoshinoya ManilaThis Beef Yakiniku is priced at P195.00.  We also ordered a Bento for each of us because it is way cheaper compared to single dish orders.

Bento sets - Yoshinoya Manila

Each Bento is comprised of a soup, an appetizer, the main dish, rice, and a dessert.  Their Bentos are priced from P159.00 to P179.00.  Really affordable compared to other Japanese restaurants I’ve been to.

PhotoGrid_1375065155218

We’ll definitely go back to this resto in our next trip to Manila. (:

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Frugal Recipe: GAPS Spaghetti Squash Pasta

Note: Aside from the fact that this recipe is budget-friendly, this is also very healthy as 1 cup serving of cooked spaghetti squash only contains 42 calories, too low compared to a cup of cooked pasta which contains 221 calories.  This is a great alternative if you are maintaining a low-calorie diet.

One of the newest crazes to run through the dietary world is the Gut and Psychology Syndrome (or GAPS) meal plan. This comprehensive diet seeks to alleviate physical complications with digesting food while at the same time increasing mental output with key nutrition. Persons on the GAPS diet have claimed that their food sensitivities and intolerance have slowed down or even reversed once they begin to adhere to the protocols of the diet. You can make a quality GAPS spaghetti squash pasta and then store it securely if you are looking for a taste bud-friendly recipe in their diet litany.

Since spaghetti tends to be a family food, with recipes that can be simple or complex, staying true to family lore or seeking new experiments to jazz up the status quo, there are many ways to get your ideal spaghetti squash pasta to taste just like the real thing. In fact, you can create the squash pasta and sauce separately, freeze either one, and simply heat it up whenever you are in the mood for a fast and tasty dinner.

Begin with a medium sized spaghetti squash, cut in half with the seeds removed (you can keep the seeds for baking or flavoring). Bake the two sides for about thirty minutes until the noodles are a bit crunchy but not too brittle. Melt four tablespoons of butter over medium heat and sauté one onion (yellow, white, or red) and a bell pepper for a minute. Add any ground meat you prefer, beef or pork or turkey, but not tofu. Add three and a half cups crushed tomatoes, lower the heat, and bring the sauce mix to a simmer. Put in Italian seasoning and salt to taste.

Scrape out the cooked spaghetti squash into a large bowl and mix in two tablespoons of tomato paste with three cloves of garlic. You can either combine noodles and sauce to make a meal, or put store one or both for future meals. The sauce will keep for two to three weeks in a sealed container when refrigerated, but the noodles will dry out in about a week or so. Both can be frozen for up to one year without worry, but the sauce will need to be thoroughly defrosted if it is put in a freezer.

Photo Credit: Healthy Living Awaits

About the Guest Author

This is another guest contribution from our friends in FoodInsurance.com.  You may follow them in Twitter.

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Foods That Are Easy To Prepare During Emergency Situations

Note: Have you ever planned for ISHTF (if shit hits the fan)?  Do you think you can survive a week of staying inside your house during emergency situations and are secured that you won’t run out of foods to eat?  If you haven’t yet, then keep on reading the guest article below from DailyBread.com.

With the “Zombie Apocalypse” (pun intended) quickly approaching, it is important to consider stockpiling food, water, and other necessities. Even those who are not worried about the Zombie Apocalypse in particular (and think preppers are weird and crazy) must have heard the countless news stories about food shortages around the globe.

Many analysts claim that the average person currently spends about a tenth of their income on food, but these analysts anticipate that this number will increase in the future. It may increase to as much as a third. To fight back in times like these, consumers have a few options.

One of the most viable options is to become food sufficient. By growing and storing your own food, you will increase your chances of surviving anything from a food shortage to a Zombie Apocalypse.

Growing your own food is one of the best ways to be self-sufficient. For best results, you should be able to can and store that food so that it lasts well into the winter months. Daily Bread – your source for the best food storage――has a lot of great ideas on how to store your necessities.

Eventually, you will need to eat your stored foods, and you may even have to come up with some innovative ways to prepare those foods. Luckily, there are several foods that are simple to prepare during an emergency.

When menu planning for an emergency, you should try to think of dishes that do not require any electricity to make, and you should focus on cooking methods that do not waste water. Potatoes are an incredible starch, and they can easily be roasted in the ashes of a smoldering fire. To add a little protein to your meal, you should consider beans. Canned or jarred beans are a simple and nutritious meal on their own, and they are doubly good when scooped over a potato. As long as you have a fire, you can get creative with your beans. A can of tomatoes, a bit of beans, and some chili powder will make a great campfire chili.

When stockpiling food for an emergency, you should focus more on your nutritional needs than your taste buds. Whole wheat crackers are easy to store, and they will make a great snack with peanut butter. You may even cover them with a canned meat like tuna. When you sprinkle a little salt on any of these treats, you will have a tasty little meal.

Dessert is important even in emergencies. Unfortunately, you may not be able to have ice cream or cake. However, a simple jar of peaches or applesauce is a great way to end a tasty emergency meal.

Photo used under Creative Commons License | Credit

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Top Filipino Restaurants in London

Note: Here is a another guest post by Clare Carmichael, a food blogger from UK.

London is a great city and there’s so much to do you’re sure to have a whale of a time. The only problem is that the British aren’t exactly known for their cooking skills so if you’re sick of greasy fry-ups and equally-as-greasy fish & chips then why not go to one of the many Filipino restaurants in London and eat a bit closer to home?

Here are a few Filipino restaurants in London:


Lutong Pinoy Filipino Restaurant

– 10 Kenway Rd, South Kensington, SW5 0RR.

With the all-you-can-eat buffet at the Filipino Restaurant costing £8.00 it means you’re able to try as many Filipino delights at once AND not break the bank. Don’t worry if you’ve nothing to chat about over dinner as there’s a TV in the corner showing Filipino game shows! If you still have some room left at the end then it’s recommended that you order the Ginatanng Bilo-Bilo, which is a steaming bowl of sago and yam in coconut milk.


Josephine’s Filipino Restaurant

–  4 Charlotte St., Fitzrovia, W1T 2LP.
Here you can sample your favourite dishes from the Philippines! The restaurant opened in 1996 and has welcomed many celebrities through its doors including celebrity chef, Gino D’Acampo, Ricky Gervais, Ken Livingstone and many others. The most popular dishes at Josephine’s are Adobo, Lechon Kawali and Halo Halo. The restaurant also caters for parties, weddings and corporate events.

Photo Credit: Kake Pugh


Kusinang Munti

– 913 Garratt Lane, Tooting Broadway, SW17 0LT.
This restaurant serves the finest Oriental and Asian cuisines such as Japanese, Chinese, Thai, Indian and Halal, but specialises in Filipino delicacies as well. A buffet is available or alternatively you can order à la carte specialities such as kare-kare, dinuguan, binagoongang baboy and many more. Kusinang Munti seats up to 55 people and can be booked for parties and special occasions.


Port of Manila

– 129-131 Brackenbury Rd, Hammersmith, W6 0BQ.
Port of Manila has received the prestigious AA Rosette Award for Culinary Excellence so it must be doing something right! Their dishes are made using recipes from all over the Philippines and the staff is known to be extremely friendly and welcoming. The food is also available for takeaway, which is perfect if you don’t want to venture outside, but are in the mood for some lovely Filipino food. This establishment has also been frequented by many V.I.P. guests such as Ambassador Lagdameo, Sarah Geronimo and Sharon Cuneta.


Kika

– 228 St. Paul’s Rd, Islington, N1 2LJ.
This Filipino restaurant also serves organic food so it’s perfect if you’re looking for Filipino grub AND are health-conscious. This establishment is best known for its breakfasts and lunches and there’s also karaoke so why not make a full night out of it? Tasty Filipino food and then a singsong afterwards. Parties of up to 25 people can be catered for and there’s also a back garden where people can sit and watch the world go by.

Photo Credit: Ewan-M


Bintang Restaurant

– 93 Kentish Town Rd, NW1 8NY.
This restaurant, which opened in 1987, specialises in Pan Asian fusion cuisine and serves dishes from Malaysia, Indonesia, Japan, Vietnam and the Philippines, of course! The interior consists of dark wood, bamboo plants and varied artwork. If you don’t like forking out for expensive wines you’ll be pleased to know that this restaurant has a BYOB policy so just head to the nearest shop and choose your own wine. If you want to celebrate there they accommodate parties of more than 15 people.


About the Guest Author
This has been a guest post by Clare Carmichael, a freelance writer for My Passion For Food and the hungryhouse magazine. The UK’s leading food delivery platform featuring restaurants from across the country including Nottingham, Glasgow and Birmingham.

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Cebu’s Authentic Cuisines

Note: This is a guest post from FoodInsurance.com.

Cebu has a rich and wonderful culture. The food is particularly appealing, as it has flavors that will appeal to everyone’s tastes. Whether you are looking for sweet, spicy, or salty foods, there is sure to be something for everyone in Cebu.

Two foods that are quite popular among the Cebuanos are their local chili pepper and their native vinegar. The chili peppers there are smaller than most, at no longer than an inch. Known as silis, they are impossible to eat alone, so they are used for flavoring dishes. It is common to squeeze their juice into sauces for an exquisite burst of flavor. The vinegar is made from the sap of the coconut trees, and is developed from the alcoholic drink called tuba. It is used to flavor nearly all of the dishes in Cebu.

Cebu Ngohiong Photo Credit: georgeparrilla

If you are looking for something quick to eat on your journeys in Cebu, look no further than the alluring street snacks. Some popular ones are the Chinese snack Cebu Ngohiong, which is a lumpia (a type of wrap) filled with meat and veggies, with spicy sauce on top. It is common to put pork in them. Another great street snack is Special Cuchinta, which is a sweet snack that is made with brown sugar, flour, lye, and has grated coconut on top. The cucumber relish and molded fruit gelatin are other common snacks in Cebu.

Cebu Cuchinta Photo Credit: bisayabulletin.com

Speaking of fruit, there are many wonderful dishes and treats which are made using the local fruit of Cebu. For a truly sweet treat, try a crunchy banana lollipop made with a banana, melted chocolate for a topping, peanut butter, shortening, and corn flakes cereal. A dish love by most pregnant women is the green mango salad. This has such diverse foods that seem to have conflicting flavors, but they are a great blend together. It consists of siling labuyo, red bell pepper, mango, green onions, shrimp, and patis. Melons are also quite popular on the island.

Green Mango Salad Photo Credit: anglaagan.wordpress.com

From the amazing restaurants serving local and International fair to the street vendors, you will not be at a loss for places in finding Cebuano foods. Even if you are far from Cebu, you can re-create the taste of Cebu in your own kitchen. Just do some recipe research online, and keep an open mind.

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How app-etising! The top food apps worldwide

Note: This is a guest post by Clare Carmichael, a food blogger from UK.

Technology is evolving as we speak and it seems like every day there are new gadgets popping up, claiming to make our life easier.

Nowadays you can feel like you’re some sort of noob if you’re not up to date. I won’t tell you how many times I’ve gone to meet a friend and they’ve been running late and used Facebook to tell me this because they presumed I had internet on my phone. In the end I gave in to peer pressure and bought myself an iPhone, which has changed my life!

I have to admit that I’ve become slightly addicted to buying apps…many of which I don’t even need! Food apps are my favourite because I love cooking and trying out new recipes. I justify my addiction by saying it’ll make my dinner parties even more spectacular!

I thought I would compile a list of the best food apps for you to enjoy:

Food Magazine Philippines

Food Magazine is known and trusted for its recipes. In each issue you’ll find at least 30 of the newest recipes to try out. The nutritional content in also given so you won’t be left wondering! Learn about home basics such as how to budget, decorate, organise and store – you’ll find a bit of everything in this magazine app. Available for iPad and Android. Rating 4.5/5.

Easy Food Magazine

If you’re on a budget and also don’t have much time to cook then this is the app for you! There are hundreds of recipes. Whether you’re a beginner or a pro, whether you’re cooking for a dinner party or just for yourself, you’ll get great hints and tips from this app. Available for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. Rating 4.5/5.

Jamie Oliver 20 minute meals

Have you always wanted to cook like the famous Jamie Oliver? This app is great for busy people who still want to cook for themselves rather than grab a cheeky takeaway on the way home from work. Each recipe is presented in easy-to-understand steps and there are photos too so you can’t really go wrong. Jamie also features in a few videos in which he gives out helpful tips. Available for Android, iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. Rating 4.2/5.

Food Planner

Food Planner is a great way to organise what you’re going to eat throughout the week so you know exactly what ingredients to purchase when you shop. You can use your own recipes or find ones online. It’s even possible to edit the recipes in case there’s something you want to add or omit to the ingredients. Available for Android. Rating 4.4/5.

Epicurious

This app has over 25,000 recipes to choose from and many have been professionally tested and featured in top magazines such as Gourmet and Bon Appétit. The step-by-step guide makes cooking easy to understand and you can even save the best recipes to your Favourites. Available for iPhone, iPad and Android. Rating 3.5/5.

Hungryhouse

If you’re ever in the UK and have no idea where to go to satisfy your hunger cravings then why not download the hungryhouse app. Just type in the cuisine you’re craving for and you’ll be shown a list of the nearest restaurants and their menus as well as customer reviews so you know which places have been recommended. Either visit the restaurant or use the app to order a takeaway directly to you. It couldn’t be easier! Available for iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and Android. Rating 4.5/5.

So what are you waiting for? Get great hints and tips from these apps and you’ll be a professional chef before you know it!

This has been a guest post by Clare Carmichael, a freelance writer for mypassionforfood and the hungryhouse magazine. The UK’s leading food delivery platform featuring restaurants from across the country including Brighton, Manchester and Glasgow.

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Times May Be a Changin’, But the Russian Cuisine Isn’t Going Anywhere

This is a guest post by Lizz Dorovitsine, a fellow blogger from Russia.  I would like to share her food story to my Cebuano-based readers to give them a glimpse about Russian culture – especially their foods.  I hope you’ll enjoy her story. – Empress Of Drac

I am a Russian-American at heart (both my parents immigrated to the States just a year before I was born) so you’d think that, when I decided to live in Russia for a year, I’d be somewhat used to the food. I could not be more wrong.

About two weeks after moving here, I began to despair of ever eating another nutritious meal. Almost every meal consisted of some form of meat and potatoes, with none of the healthy grains, vegetables, or fruits I was used to seeing, and I was forced to turn to McDonalds salads for my necessary intake of greens (definitely a low point in my life).

But eventually, Russian cuisine started to make sense to me – I not only found cultural reasons for the carb-heavy diet, but I also started trying out more traditional Russian dishes and realized that maybe there was more to Russian food that I originally thought.

Let’s start at the very beginning. When I first started questioning the Russian need for meat and potatoes, my grandfather explained their diet in historical terms. Imagine, for a minute, that you lived back in ancient Russia, a freezing, barren wasteland, and had to figure out some way to live through the winter. Forget preserving anything fresh, because that’ll spoil right away. Instead, the Russian people back then stored meat, in the form of actual living animals or salted meats which were stored throughout the cold, and root vegetables, such as beets, carrots, and onions. They also needed food that was starch-heavy and was rich in calories, but inexpensive to grow or raise. Hence, the Russian culinary love for potatoes was born.

Kotlety [Photo Credit: girlsguidetobutter.com]

Russians also eat a lot of bread and use fatty condiments, such as mayonnaise and sour cream. As I soon learned, this trait is tied to the poverty in which many Russian citizens lived as well. Throughout history, Russians needed to eat foods that would get them through the freezing winters and difficult times – historically, Russia’s had quite a few of those, the most recent example being the Soviet Era. So what better way to pack on the pounds than adding bread and extra calories to everything? Of course, this is no longer necessary, but a lot of Russian food is based on these primary ingredients – and they actually taste amazing.

One such example is a pancake dish that Russians love. These pancakes, or “bliny”, are essentially a Russian version of crepes, which can be eaten with everything from caviar to Nutella or jam. There’s even a special week right before Lent, called Maslenitsa, where the primary food is pancakes. It’s a genius idea, and a delicious meal at any time on top of that. Russians also eat a lot of soup – understandable because their country is freezing. My personal favorite is a soup called “borscht”, a distinctly red soup made of beets, along with other root vegetables, potatoes, and meat. The taste is really unique, because of the beet-infused broth, and topped with sour cream, this dish cannot be beat.

Bliny [Photo Credit: 02varvara.wordpress.com]

Russians have their fair share of delicious entrees too. I was completely opposed to eating sour cream in any dishes when I first got here – the taste was bland and it wasn’t even healthy. But a lot of really great dishes here are made with sour cream – in fact, one chicken dish with a sour cream and carrot sauce has become my favorite. And while the ingredients Russian use in the kitchen may not be too varied, the resulting meals come in all shapes and sizes, making for an exquisite culinary experience.

Russian food can be a little hard to understand at first – I would be the first to admit it – but once you understand some of the history behind Russian cuisine and try more of their meals, it’s hard not to fall in love with Russian food.

Lizz Dorovitsine is a high-school graduate who took a gap year to live and work in Russia. She currently works as an English editor for the World Economic Journal, and writes for her personal blog, “How to Survive Russia” (www.howtosurviverussia.com) in her free time. To read more about Lizz’s story, click here:  http://howtosurviverussia.com/my-story/ .
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